Chantel

Editor’s Note: In August 2007, Ira kicked off his series of educational columns. This month, he continues his instruction on Building Pricing Backbone, which incorporates several staples from his earlier columns. Part 10: Last month we discussed the importance of establishing Backbone systems—these are standardized systems you can refer to when Ballparking. Ballparking Is Not an Estimating Exercise; It’s a Selling Exercise Let’s review the Ballparking process. First, you Ballpark after you’ve developed a Performance List with your prospect. The Ballpark number is thrown out to establish a value for the project. As discussed earlier, the Performance List is a well-established story you

Editor’s Note: In August 2007, Ira kicked off his series of educational columns. This month, he continues his instruction on Building Pricing Backbone, which incorporates several staples from his earlier columns.
Part 10:
Last month we discussed the importance of establishing Backbone systems—these are standardized systems you can refer to when Ballparking.
Ballparking Is Not an Estimating Exercise; It’s a Selling Exercise
Let’s review the Ballparking process. First, you Ballpark after you’ve developed a Performance List with your prospect. The Ballpark number is thrown out to establish a value for the project. As discussed earlier, the Performance List is a well-established story you

Editor’s note: In August 2007, Ira kicked off his series of educational columns. This month, he focuses on Ballparking. Different than estimating, Ballparking proves your abilities and strengthens trust between you and the client. Part 8: Once you’ve developed a Performance List and you’re able to recite it back to your prospect, it’s time to start Ballparking. Ballparking is your way of immediately sharing pricing information. It’s your rough estimate for each constituent and discipline of the project. Ballparking is not the same as estimating. It is a way for you to test your prospect’s understanding early on in the process. Companion Selling treats

Editor’s note: In August 2007, Ira kicked off his series of educational columns. This month, he focuses on Ballparking. Different than estimating, Ballparking proves your abilities and strengthens trust between you and the client.
Part 8:
Once you’ve developed a Performance List and you’re able to recite it back to your prospect, it’s time to start Ballparking. Ballparking is your way of immediately sharing pricing information. It’s your rough estimate for each constituent and discipline of the project.
Ballparking is not the same as estimating. It is a way for you to test your prospect’s understanding early on in the process. Companion Selling treats

Editor’s Note: In August, Ira kicked off his series of educational columns. This month, he reviews the advantages of asking “What If” questions. He emphasizes their ability to engage your client, create enthusiasm and ensure a fantastic end-result, no matter the size of the project. Part 4: When Chantel meets her prospective client, she asks a lot of “What If” questions. “I know you want this room to be brighter and sunnier than it is now. What if we knocked through this wall and added a window right here? That would look great!” Or, “What if we added extra lighting fixtures to

Editor’s Note: In August, Ira kicked off his series of educational columns. This month, he reviews the advantages of asking “What If” questions. He emphasizes their ability to engage your client, create enthusiasm and ensure a fantastic end-result, no matter the size of the project.
Part 4:
When Chantel meets her prospective client, she asks a lot of “What If” questions.
“I know you want this room to be brighter and sunnier than it is now. What if we knocked through this wall and added a window right here? That would look great!”
Or, “What if we added extra lighting fixtures to

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