Wal-Mart

Retailers see Smaller Outlets as the Next Big Thing
February 29, 2012

Bigger is not always better. Just ask the biggest retailers in the country - and their customers.

To Neng Yang, the Best Buy store in Independence, Mo., is just too overwhelming - so much so that she only shops there once a year, at the holidays. So when she needed a new cellphone, she bypassed the 55,000-square-foot store with its many departments - appliances, big-screen TVs, computers, cameras, car audio, video and music. Instead, she stopped across the street at the Best Buy Mobile store.

The slimmed-down 850-square-foot sister store concentrates only on mobile

The Changing Customer
January 16, 2009

Recently, I received a call from a custom retailer in the Midwest. He commented that there was no conversation on how customers are changing. This dealer believes his customers are changing, and not necessarily for the good. To paraphrase his comments, he said: I have not seen any mention by you or anyone else on the changes of how customers are dealing with custom retailers.

Time to... Think Upmarket
December 29, 2008

It sure isn’t a pretty economic picture out there these days, especially in the mass market—in fact, all the way up to the upper-middle-class, or people who could tentatively describe themselves as millionaires.

Walmart, Dell, Team Up on Tech Services
July 17, 2008

Walmart is planning to go ahead with its plan to offer installation and tech help services, along the lines of Best Buy’s Geek Squad and Circuit City’s firedog. It’s called Solution Station, and they’re doing it with an unexpected partner- Dell. According to the Wall Street Journal, the retail giant and the computer maker have agreed to test the concept in 15 Walmart stores in the Dallas area, in a program that will roll out this week. The two companies will “evaluate the concept” in a few months, Dell executives told the Journal. Do you think this service will be a success?

Wal*Mart Installation Ambitions Questioned
June 30, 2008

Wal*Mart last month began making noises about launching an electronics service and installation arm, along the lines of Best Buy’s Geek Squad, a move that could have a profound effect on the market for such services nationwide. However, according to the Corporate Dealmaker column on the financial Web site TheDeal.com, industry leaders and other experts are questioning how such a service would work, especially because there isn’t any national services and installation firm large enough to partner with Wal*Mart nationwide. The CEA’s chief economist, Shawn DuBravac, told TheDeal that he could not think of a potential service provider with which Wal*Mart could

Wal*Mart Considering a Geek Squad of Its Own
June 16, 2008

Wal*Mart is giving consideration to adding an electronics support and services arm to compete with Best Buy’s Geek Squad and Circuit City’s firedog. That’s according to a report this week on Marketwatch.com, citing comments from a top executive. Wal*Mart senior vice president Gary Severson told the Marketwatch reporter that the company is “looking at different options” in regards to whether the company will expand its electronics operations to include installations, repairs and other services. Do you think a Wal*Mart Geek Squad could work? Talk about it in the Dealerscope forums.

The Flip Side
March 1, 2008

I got off the plane and felt like I’d landed on another planet. I picked up a paper and saw a headline that read: “Retail sales in December rise for the 7th consecutive month.” The news included stories about rising interest rates, job growth and increasing wages.
I was excited to read a story about the country’s largest home goods retailer reporting a 13 percent increase in fourth quarter sales, largely from sales of flat screen TVs. The company reported plans to open 50 new stores in 2008.
The report was not from Best Buy or Wal-Mart, but from Australia’s Harvey

A Country Called Custom
March 1, 2008

Readers of this publication are well aware of the economic, social, political and environmental factors at play in shaping the character of the custom installation discipline in the American market—and of how changes both subtle and violent demand a delicate balance of well-considered pre-planning and rapid reaction, depending on what can and cannot be predicted. The best custom integrators plot their strategies based on personal experience, what they read about in the trades and over the Web, and what they hear during buying group and other peer networking opportunities at industry shows. What they may not know is that there is a

The Flip Side
March 1, 2008

I got off the plane and felt like I’d landed on another planet. I picked up a paper and saw a headline that read: “Retail sales in December rise for the 7th consecutive month.” The news included stories about rising interest rates, job growth and increasing wages. I was excited to read a story about the country’s largest home goods retailer reporting a 13 percent increase in fourth quarter sales, largely from sales of flat screen TVs. The company reported plans to open 50 new stores in 2008. The report was not from Best Buy or Wal-Mart, but from Australia’s Harvey